Notable residents – Witheridge Devon http://witheridge-devon.com/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 05:16:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://witheridge-devon.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/devon-150x150.png Notable residents – Witheridge Devon http://witheridge-devon.com/ 32 32 Staffordshire residents face £ 200 fine if they do not wear masks as Omicron threat increases https://witheridge-devon.com/staffordshire-residents-face-200-fine-if-they-do-not-wear-masks-as-omicron-threat-increases/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 05:00:00 +0000 https://witheridge-devon.com/staffordshire-residents-face-200-fine-if-they-do-not-wear-masks-as-omicron-threat-increases/ Staffordshire residents are urged to follow the new mask wearing rules and get their booster shots to help prevent a wave of the Omicron variant of Covid-19. Regulations requiring the wearing of face coverings in shops and on public transport have been reinstated in England as of today (30 November), in response to the threat […]]]>

Staffordshire residents are urged to follow the new mask wearing rules and get their booster shots to help prevent a wave of the Omicron variant of Covid-19.

Regulations requiring the wearing of face coverings in shops and on public transport have been reinstated in England as of today (30 November), in response to the threat posed by the latest ‘worrying variant’ – with 200 £ fine for offenders.

The Omicron variant, which was first identified in South Africa last week, is distinguished by its large number of mutations, which could make it more transmissible.

Click here for more coronavirus news

There have now been 11 confirmed cases of Omicron in the UK, including an infection in Nottingham, although experts believe that number will rise in the coming days.

In addition to the mask rule, the government has announced that the booster vaccine program will be accelerated, with a third vaccine offered to everyone over 18, and the gap between the second and the booster being reduced from six to three. month. Children aged 12 to 15 will also be offered a second dose three months after the first.

Although no case of Omicron has yet been recorded in Staffordshire, Dr Richard Harling, director of health and care for Staffordshire County Council, says residents must do everything possible to prevent the spread of the virus .

Dr Harling said: ‘We have had the first cases of the new Omicron variant confirmed in the UK, and I have no doubt there will be more in the coming days. Although we have no confirmed cases of this variant in Staffordshire, we still need to do everything possible to reduce the spread of Covid-19.



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“The emergence of this new variant shows how important it is for everyone to do their part to reduce the spread of the virus. In addition to following the new rules issued by the government, it is now more important than ever to be vaccinated with its 1st and 2nd dose and its booster.

“People should also test themselves when they are in high-risk situations, such as visiting an elderly relative or entering a crowded public space. By following these simple steps, we can minimize the spread of Covid-19 and protect the most vulnerable in our communities. “

Other measures introduced in response to Omicron include:

  • All contacts of suspected Omicron cases will need to self-isolate for 10 days, regardless of their vaccination status
  • Anyone entering the UK will need to undergo a PCR test two days after arrival and will need to self-isolate until they have a negative test result
  • Secondary schools are “strongly advised” to introduce the wearing of face coverings in common areas by staff and students

Health Secretary Sajid Javid briefed MPs on measures taken to tackle Omicron on Monday.

He said: “Our vaccines remain our best line of defense against this virus, no matter what form it attacks us. We don’t know much about how our vaccine responds to this new variant.

“But while it is possible that they are less effective, it is highly unlikely that they will have any effectiveness against serious diseases.

“So it’s very important that we get as many hits in the arms as possible.”

Mr Javid also said the new restrictions would not be in place “a day longer than necessary” if it turned out that Omicron was no more dangerous than Delta.

Stoke-on-Trent currently has a seven-day infection rate of 456.7 cases per 100,000 people – slightly higher than the UK rate of 439.5 and 3.4% higher than the week before. The rate in Newcastle is 424.3. while in the Staffordshire Moorlands it is 471.4.

The latest figures from North Midlands University Hospitals show that as of November 23 there were 73 Covid-positive patients occupying beds, including 10 in mechanical ventilation beds.

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Grants Support History and Humanities at Virginia City, University of Montana | State and regional https://witheridge-devon.com/grants-support-history-and-humanities-at-virginia-city-university-of-montana-state-and-regional/ Sun, 28 Nov 2021 13:00:00 +0000 https://witheridge-devon.com/grants-support-history-and-humanities-at-virginia-city-university-of-montana-state-and-regional/ In 1870, teenage Sarah Gammon set out in a boxcar for the nearly 2,000 mile journey from Knoxville, Tennessee, to the burgeoning western mining town of Virginia City. Orphaned from slavery, her trip was at the behest of John Murphy, who during the Civil War had commanded black infantry troops. Gammon had been hired as […]]]>

In 1870, teenage Sarah Gammon set out in a boxcar for the nearly 2,000 mile journey from Knoxville, Tennessee, to the burgeoning western mining town of Virginia City.

Orphaned from slavery, her trip was at the behest of John Murphy, who during the Civil War had commanded black infantry troops. Gammon had been hired as a nanny for Murphy’s two foster children.

Although Murphy’s stay in Montana was short, Gammon went on to become one of the best-known and successful black businesswomen of her time, owning a public service – the Virginia City Water Company. She is now better known as Sarah Bickford, the last name of her second husband.






The Hangman Building was where Sarah Bickford had her Virginia City Water Company headquarters.


Montana Heritage Commission


Virginia City

A recent endowment for the National Endowment for the Humanities American Rescue Plan Humanities Organizations will fund further research on people like Bickford and other African Americans linked to Montana history.

“The effort is to really fill out the story as best we can and have a plan to talk about it,” said Chere Jiusto, executive director of Preserve Montana, who is part of the consulting team for the project. .

The grant of $ 191,488 to the Montana Heritage Commission will help stabilize the cultural organization and support its continued work after the setbacks of last year’s pandemic, Jiusto added.

People also read …






Sarah bickford

Slavery separated Sarah Bickford from her family before she became a pioneering western businesswoman in Virginia City.


Montana Historical Society


The project “will support MHC staff and several renowned academics, to document the legacy of African American settlers in the Virginia City gold mining past, work to preserve three residences and buildings that reflect their history, and share the stories of these African American pioneers with the public, “according to a press release from the Montana Heritage Commission.” These properties were home to enterprising black women – Sarah Bickford and her sisters Minerva and Parthenia Coggswell, as well as the cargo ship Jack Taylor.

“The African-American properties of Virginia City are rare places where the lives of black settlers are reflected on our early gold mining frontiers,” said Elijah Allen, executive director of the commission. “In Virginia City, we are fortunate to have three properties where visitors can visit and imagine what life was like for black pioneers in Montana, just after the Civil War, in the early mining districts. “

Allen added that he was particularly interested in shedding light on Montana’s first black female entrepreneurs while also “learning about the many hardships she and others faced in the 1860s.”






Sarah Bickford House

Sarah Bickford’s home has been updated for modern Virginia City residents.


Montana Heritage Commission


Buildings

Two of the buildings are log cabins built in the 1860s and later connected by a false facade. Minerva Coggswell acquired the property, according to her will, “through her own hard work”.

She and her sister, Parthenia Sneed, did laundry, ran a restaurant, and in 1880 looked after boarders like African-American Jack Taylor, born in Kentucky.

Taylor served in the Union Army as a stable arm during the Civil War and came to Virginia City in 1866 as a freight carrier. He accumulated enough wealth to purchase 160 acres nearby, where he raised and sold cattle. When Coggswell died in 1894, he purchased the cabins in Virginia City. Then Bickford acquired them after his death.

“The story of the house is really important because it shows how they got there, found a way to make a living and be part of the community,” Jiusto said.

Another of the structures is known as Hangman’s Building, the place where vigilantes suspended five outlaws in 1864 and which Bickford later purchased as the seat of his water service.

Jiusto said the Virginia City work would provide an interpretation showing how the city’s blacks were representative of others across the mining west. Sadly, she noted, not much remains of these other communities, while Virginia City is teeming with preserved structures.

“It really is a long-needed effort with such a rare setting for properties,” Jiusto said.






Sarah Gammon Bickford

As a teenager, Sarah Bickford traveled to Montana and became one of the most successful black businesswomen in the state.


Public domain


The two-year project will begin this fall and run until 2023, according to MHC. The work will include the preservation and interpretation of properties, artefacts, restoration of a heritage garden and a new virtual tour of a mobile app and online exhibits. The garden will reflect what people were growing at the time, Jiusto said.

In a 2014 article, University of Oregon history professor Kingston Heath said the cabins, “owned and occupied by several generations of African-American pioneers, may better tell the story of the perseverance, family and community ties and entrepreneurship among people of color in this gold mining town. ” He added that the buildings are “important because of how they were used and by whom rather than their architectural fabric.”

The research will help recognize African Americans, minority citizens who, according to historian Ellen Baumler, are often not recognized for their “indelible marks on our history.”

As in other parts of the United States, however, black people in Montana have faced prejudice and discrimination. They were excluded from businesses and often confined to menial jobs. This resulted in tight-knit black communities, exemplified by the Virginia City pioneers.






Coggswell Taylor House

The Coggswell Taylor Houses were reunited in the 1890s. Minerva Coggswell acquired the houses where she operated businesses with her sister.


Montana Heritage Commission


Others

The National Endowment for the Humanities received 937 eligible applications and was able to fund 292 organizations affected by the coronavirus pandemic through its program which distributed $ 87.8 million. Part of the program awarded funds to state social science organizations. Under this, Humanities Montana received $ 626,658 while Wyoming received $ 591,737.

The grants targeted “cultural and educational institutions to help them recover from the economic impact of the pandemic, retain and rehire workers, and reopen sites, facilities and programs,” according to the NEH website.

The other two grant recipients in Montana were: the Crow Language Consortium for the production of two books on the history of Crow and three humanities projects at the University of Montana.

UM grant

The $ 499,000 grant to the University of Montana “will support programming, courses and scholarships in history, literature, anthropology and Native American studies within the College of Humanities and Sciences at UM,” according to UM.

“For us in the humanities, this is a very big deal,” wrote Tobin Miller Shearer, professor of history and African American studies at UM and UM’s Institute of Humanities. , in an email. “Normally, if we’re really, really lucky, we might get a grant in the range of $ 30,000 to $ 50,000. It is several orders of magnitude larger.

The money will be used to publicize the humanities with a series of speakers, films and a new website examining racial justice, death in the COVID era, indigenous knowledge and several other areas, Shearer said.

He explained that the grant money is “less focused on creating new knowledge through research and more on disseminating and interpreting existing knowledge to the public. Our goal is to provide Montana residents with the knowledge and frameworks to understand issues of racial justice, COVID-era death, Indigenous knowledge, and several other key areas. “

UM said the funding would also support a “postdoctoral fellowship, a summer course for high school students interested in the humanities, and additional funding for graduate student research, program support, and scholarships.” .

Gillian Glaes, program director for the Institute for the Humanities and Humanities at UM and visiting associate professor of history, called the grant a “game changer” when it comes to supporting faculty, students and scholars. programs that will enable innovative work.

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WPIAL Class 3A Football Championship Breakdown: Central Valley vs. North Catholic https://witheridge-devon.com/wpial-class-3a-football-championship-breakdown-central-valley-vs-north-catholic/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 20:25:29 +0000 https://witheridge-devon.com/wpial-class-3a-football-championship-breakdown-central-valley-vs-north-catholic/ Through: Chris Harlan Friday November 26, 2021 | 3:22 p.m. Christophe Horner | Tribune-Review North Catholic quarterback Joey Prentice trains on August 9, 2021 in Cranberry. Christophe Horner | Tribune-Review Landon Alexander of Central Vallley celebrates his first touchdown with assistant coach Shawn McCreary during the first quarter against Aliquippa on Friday, September 10, 2021, […]]]>

Through:


Friday November 26, 2021 | 3:22 p.m.


WPIAL Class 3A Football Championship

No. 1 Central Valley vs. No. 2 North Catholic

Saturday noon, Heinz Field

On air : Television: WPCW; Audio: TribHSSN.TribLive.com, WBVP-AM

The winner plays: Winner of District 10 Champion Grove City (10-2) over District 6 Champion Martinsburg Central (13-0) in a PIAA semi-final on December 3 or 4.

WPIAL titles: Central Valley 4 (2010, ’14, ’29, ’20), North Catholic 1 (2013)

Central Valley (12-0)

Player to watch: Landon Alexander

Alexander has traditionally done some of his best playoff jobs. This season, he’s already racked up 368 yards and four touchdowns in Central Valley’s two playoff wins. The running back has eight 100-yard games this season, has passed 200 yards on four occasions and has scored at least one touchdown in his team’s 12 games.

Statistics managers

Who passed: Antwon Johnson, 47-85, 990 yards, 15 TDs

To rush : Landon Alexander, 167 – 1,730 yards, 25 touchdowns

Reception: Jayvin Thompson, 23-559, 6 TDs

How they got here: After a pass in the first round, the Central Valley No.1 defeated No.9 East Allegheny, 48-6, and No.4 Elizabeth Forward, 51-0.

Probable starting eleven

Coach: Marc Lyon

Offense

QB, 5, Antwon Johnson, 5-11, 185, jr.

RB, 23, Landon Alexander, 5-11, 195, sr.

WR, 2 Donovan Jones, 6-1, 155, sr.

WR, 7, Jayvin Thompson, 6-2, 185, jr.

WR, 21, Deniro Simpson, 5-8, 140, jr.

TE, 80, Jack Bible, 6-1, 205, sr.

LT, 67, Jordan Karczewski, 6-3, 225, sr.

LG, 50, Sean Fitzsimmons, 6-3, 280, father.

C, 53, Jackson Tonya, 6-1, 225, jr.

RG, 73 years old, Kaden Colville, 5-10, 218, jr.

RT, 74, Nick McCreary, 6-1, 253, so.

Defense

DE, 50, Sean FitzSimmons, 6-3, 280, sr.

DE, 53, Jackson Tonya, 6-1, 225, jr.

NG, 67, Jordan Karczewski, 6-3, 225, sr.

LB, 6, Matt Merritt, 6-2, 210, sr.

LB, 10, Bret FitzSimmons, 5-10, 170, jr.

LB, 80, Jack Bible, 6-1, 205, sr.

CB, 3, Rylan Jeter, 5-11, 165, jr.

CB, 23, Landon Alexander, 5-11, 195, sr.

S, 4, Bryce Wilson, 5-9, 168, sr.

S, Jayvin Thompson, 6-2, 185, jr.

Special teams

K, 18, Serafino DeSantis, 6-0, 183, jr.

P, 18, Bryce Wilson, 5-9, 158, sr.

LS, 10 years old, Bret FitzSimmons, 5-10, 170, jr.

Notable: Central Valley has the longest active winning streak in the state with 24 games. The team is the reigning state champion and two reigning WPIAL champion. … The Warriors have reached the WPIAL final for the seventh time in the school’s 12-year history. They are 4-2 in WPIAL title matches. … Central Valley was formed in 2010 when Center and Monaca merged. … Sean FitzSimmons has a total of 100 tackles with 39 tackles for a loss and 15 sacks. Pitt’s rookie has 46 layoffs. He was credited with seven sacks in Central Valley’s quarter-final victory over East Allegheny on November 12. … Linebacker Jackson Tonya is second with 97 tackles, Jack Bible has 84 and Bret FitzSimmons has 83.

Northern Catholic (12-0)

Player to watch: Joey prentice

Prentice makes a difference on both sides of the game as a starting quarterback and free safety. His one-yard run was the only touchdown in a 7-0 semifinal victory over Avonworth. He has eight touchdowns on the ground but has done more damage this year in the air. He threw four touchdowns in a regular season win over South Park and scored five against Derry.

Statistics managers

Who passed: Joey Prentice, 86-134, 1,582 yards, 22 touchdowns

To rush : Kyle Tipinski, 89-514 yards, 8 TDs

Reception: Kyle Tipinski, 27-516 yards, 9 TDs

How they got here: After a pass in the first round, No. 2 North Catholic beat No. 7 Keystone Oaks, 48-41, and No. 3 Avonworth, 7-0.

Coach: Patrick O’Shea

Offense

QB, 1, Joey Prentice, 6-1, 200, sr.

RB, 13, Jack Fennell, 5-10, 170, so.

HB, 31, Daniel Long, 6-0, 220, jr.

WR, 3, Kyle Tipinski, 6-2, 213, sr.

WR, 17, Tyler Maziarz, 6-1, 170, sr.

WR, 26, Liam Straub, 5-10, 170, sr.

LT, 74, JJ Iaquinta, 6-2, 250, jr.

LG, 77, Justin Smith, 6-0, 272, jr.

C, 52, Tyler Primrose, 5-11, 226, sr.

RG, 59, Andrew Stephens, 5-10, 220, sr.

RT, 56, Shamus Straub, 6-0, 227, jr.

Defense

DE, 52 years old, Tyler Primrose, 5-11, 226, sr.

NT, 72, Dante Prentice, 6-1, 255, fr.

DE, 31, Daniel Long, 6-0, 220, jr.

OLB, 21, Mitch Lanthaler, 6-2, 180, jr.

ILB, 3, Kyle Tipinski, 6-2, 213, sr.

ILB, 56, Shamus Straub, 6-0, 227, jr.

OLB, 81, Robbie Kress, 6-2, 193, sr.

CB, 2, Carson Laconi, 6-1, 167, sr.

S, 1, Joey Prentice, 6-1, 200, sr.

S, 17, Tyler Maziarz, 6-1, 170, sr.

CB, 26, Liam Straub, 5-10, 170, sr.

Special teams

K, 14, Ethan Marsico, 5-9, 150, sr.

P, 31, Daniel Long, 6-0, 220, jr.

LS, 59, Andrew Stephens, 5-10, 220, sr.

Notable: This is North Catholic’s second appearance in the WPIAL final. … Les Troyens have shut out seven opponents this season. Central Valley has five shutouts. … The class 3A final corresponds to the two strongest offenses in the classification against the two weakest defenses. North Catholic is averaging 40.7 points on offense and allowing 7.7 points on defense. The central valley averages are 47.7 and 6.3. … The finalists have faced five common opponents this season. Central Valley topped those teams 313-50 and North Catholic won 207-72.

Chris Harlan is a staff writer for Tribune-Review. You can contact Chris by email at charlan@triblive.com or via Twitter .

Key words: , northern Catholic

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Oak “remarkable” under which you would not want to live “saved from the coast https://witheridge-devon.com/oak-remarkable-under-which-you-would-not-want-to-live-saved-from-the-coast/ Thu, 25 Nov 2021 01:00:00 +0000 https://witheridge-devon.com/oak-remarkable-under-which-you-would-not-want-to-live-saved-from-the-coast/ A Picton homeowner who has approached council in hopes of having a large oak tree removed from outside his house is disappointed that he is staying where he is. The man, Clive Whitlock, said he was still thinking the tree wouldn’t be cut down. The 91-year-old Quercus palustris, or Pin Oak, is a few yards […]]]>

A Picton homeowner who has approached council in hopes of having a large oak tree removed from outside his house is disappointed that he is staying where he is.

The man, Clive Whitlock, said he was still thinking the tree wouldn’t be cut down.

The 91-year-old Quercus palustris, or Pin Oak, is a few yards from Whitlock’s house. He says it’s a risk all year round, not just when the leaves end up in the gutter in the fall.

Whitlock first approached Marlborough District Council about the tree in 2017. A meeting was held and it was agreed that security checks and pruning would take place annually.

READ MORE:
* A princely tree could be replaced by another in central Blenheim
* Marlborough landowners dig to help cut costs for saving 70 oak trees
* Oak Tree Cottage damaged demolished

A year later, Whitlock and 10 other residents petitioned council to have the tree removed.

Safety checks by council contract arborists found the tree healthy, but Whitlock said it was only a matter of time before the tree caused serious damage to his home.

Whitlock first contacted Marlborough District Council in 2017.

BRYA INGRAM / STUFF

Whitlock first contacted Marlborough District Council in 2017.

“I felt very disappointed. I’m still thinking about it, “he said.

“I think what they [the council] do not realize [is] that the tree is not just a nuisance in the fall when it drops its leaves. It’s all year round, whenever we have strong gusts of wind, pieces fall off branches and things, land on the roof and all around.

“One of these days I think something bigger is going to fall off and do some real damage.”

Marlborough District Councilor David Oddie mentioned the tree in August, saying a massive amount of tree nuisance had been inflicted on the Whitlocks.

“This [the pin oak] dominates their house, the roots are in their foundations, ”said Oddie.

“You just wouldn’t want to live under a tree this size. “

But it was at an assets and services meeting earlier this month that Marlborough District Councilors agreed not to cut the tree down, instead doing a better job of having it pruned every year.

But Whitlock wasn’t convinced that would be enough.

“I don’t think that will solve the problems. It’s a matter of waiting. “

Whitlock believes the tree's roots mutilated the concrete path leading to his house and entered the house's foundation, although he has yet to find any evidence.

BRYA INGRAM / STUFF

Whitlock believes the tree’s roots mutilated the concrete path leading to his house and entered the house’s foundation, although he has yet to find any evidence.

A report prepared for the meeting said residents and the wider community had been consulted on whether the tree should be removed. Of the 48 responses, 27 supported its deletion.

The report states that after evaluating the “provisions of the council’s tree policy”, it was recommended that the request to remove the tree be refused, due to its state of health, its listing. as a “remarkable” tree, the character it has given to the region. and because it had been assessed as low risk.

But even during the meeting, some councilors were concerned about the tree’s proximity to the house.

Deputy Mayor Nadine Taylor said she herself wouldn’t like to live next to the tree.

“I have a pretty firm vision, it’s not a tree I would like to live under at all, and 26 of the residents aren’t happy living below,” Taylor said.

Taylor said it’s “easy enough” not to want a tree removed, when you don’t live underneath.

“I firmly believe that the tree should be removed.”

Councilor Cynthia Brooks said being an “approach to the trees” she had given the situation serious thought.

She said she wanted to see more evidence of how the tree looked after it was pruned.

“I wouldn’t want to live with that either. I want to find a compromise.

Councilor Brian Dawson asked council staff member Robin Dunn, who was the director of parks and recreation, if the same street was built today, if the same tree would be planted.

Dunn admitted that an oak would not be the first choice for Picton, as it was not representative of the region.

Despite these views, the committee came to the conclusion that it should follow the report’s recommendation to conserve the tree.

Marlborough Mayor John Leggett said it gave him “confidence” that they could examine the tree’s impacts again, if they needed to.

“I think it’s important that it’s a tree that is inspected regularly, so if things change, we have to be prepared to see it again,” he said.

He said it was important to take into consideration that the tree had been assessed as healthy and was listed as an outstanding tree.

Councilor Jamie Arbuckle, who was not on the Assets and Services Committee, said large trees were not a “bad thing.” He said when he went to the full council he would recommend that the tree not be cut down.

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Vaccines to remain optional for UW workers as courts review warrants | Wyoming News https://witheridge-devon.com/vaccines-to-remain-optional-for-uw-workers-as-courts-review-warrants-wyoming-news/ Sun, 21 Nov 2021 22:30:00 +0000 https://witheridge-devon.com/vaccines-to-remain-optional-for-uw-workers-as-courts-review-warrants-wyoming-news/ Three federal vaccine mandates could potentially impact the University of Wyoming. But until the courts decide their legality, Wyoming’s only four-year public university will continue its policy of encouraging vaccinations without making them mandatory, the school said. Wyoming and other states are challenging three vaccination warrants established by the Biden administration: on companies with more […]]]>

Three federal vaccine mandates could potentially impact the University of Wyoming. But until the courts decide their legality, Wyoming’s only four-year public university will continue its policy of encouraging vaccinations without making them mandatory, the school said.

Wyoming and other states are challenging three vaccination warrants established by the Biden administration: on companies with more than 100 workers, on employees of federal contractors, and on facilities that accept Medicare and Medicaid patients.

The university will not require vaccines from its employees if the courts block those warrants, the school said.

“We are closely monitoring these cases – while providing the information requested by the Wyoming attorney general – to determine if and when we will need to implement the vaccine requirements for university employees,” the president said. UW’s Ed Seidel in a statement. ready to do it, but we don’t know at this point when it might be needed.

The university is imposing COVID vaccines for a group of employees: workers at its early care and education center. Overall, employer tenure is relatively rare in Wyoming, with a few notable exceptions, including four hospitals owned by Banner Health, including Casper’s Wyoming Medical Center.

People also read …

About a month ago, lawmakers met with the intention of fighting against vaccination mandates. But only one of the 20 bills survived the special session, and it does not block mandates.

Wyoming remains one of the most vaccine-reluctant states in the country, with just 45% of the state fully vaccinated, according to the Mayo Clinic. It is the second lowest rate in the country, ahead of only West Virginia. About 53% of residents received at least one dose.

By comparison, two-thirds of UW employees have received at least one dose of the vaccine, according to the school.

Although the school does not mandate vaccines for most of its employees, its administrators have approved an indoor mask requirement. Last week, administrators voted to extend the term at least until mid-December.

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“Houghton: The Cradle of Professional Hockey” | News, Sports, Jobs https://witheridge-devon.com/houghton-the-cradle-of-professional-hockey-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 07:52:30 +0000 https://witheridge-devon.com/houghton-the-cradle-of-professional-hockey-news-sports-jobs/ William Sproule’s book, “Houghton: The Birthplace of Professional Hockey,” is the star of the December 9 Authors’ Event hosted by the UP Notable Book Club. The event will take place via Zoom. (Photo courtesy of the Upper Peninsula Editors and Authors Association) MARQUETTE – Hockey seasons are underway, which means many fans are getting a […]]]>

William Sproule’s book, “Houghton: The Birthplace of Professional Hockey,” is the star of the December 9 Authors’ Event hosted by the UP Notable Book Club. The event will take place via Zoom. (Photo courtesy of the Upper Peninsula Editors and Authors Association)

MARQUETTE – Hockey seasons are underway, which means many fans are getting a dose of their favorite sport at their favorite rinks. However, anyone who wants to learn a little more about hockey – and maybe just a bit of regional history – should attend the UP Notable Book Club’s December 9 event on the book titled “Houghton: The birthplace of professional hockey. “

The Crystal Falls Community District Library, which schedules author events with the Upper Peninsula Publishers and Authors Association, with a focus on the UP Outstanding Book List winners, will feature William Sproule whose authoritative history book on the birth of professional hockey in the land of copper makes a bold claim to his birthplace, said the UPPAA.

The event is open free of charge to all UP residents. It will begin at 7 p.m. on December 9 via Zoom. Contact Evelyn Gathu in advance at egathu@uproc.lib.mi.us or 906-875-3344. UPPAA recommends that attendees borrow a copy of the book from their local library or purchase it in advance from a local bookseller to get the most out of the event.

Sproule is Professor Emeritus at Michigan Tech University where he taught transportation engineering, transit, airport planning, and hockey history. He is a member of several associations including the Historical Society of Michigan and the Society for International Hockey Research.

Sproule is co-author of the airport handbook, “Airport planning and design”, author of several conference proceedings on automated people transfer systems and author of several other local books: “The trams of the land of copper” and “Michigan Tech Hockey: 00 years of memories. “

At the Dec. 9 event, Sproule plans to discuss Houghton’s hockey book, but will likely be tied to Michigan Tech’s hockey history, the UPPAA said.

UPPAA President Victor R. Volkman wrote on “Houghton: The Cradle of Professional Hockey” in the book review UP.

“If you have a taste for hockey nostalgia, the local history of the Copper Country, or just love one of Michigan’s most popular winter pastimes, you’ll enjoy” Houghton: The Birthplace of Professional Hockey “from William J. Sproule for humanity it brings to players and their cold winter sagas of the early 1900s”, said Volkman.

Volkman said Sproule tells the story of a Canadian born dentist and Houghton entrepreneur, Jack “Doc” Gibson, changed hockey by openly paying players to come to the Copper Country to play hockey.

Gibson partnered with local businessman James Dee to recruit the best Canadian players and pay them to compete for the Portage Lake hockey team, making them the very first hockey team. professional, said Volkman.

Sproule’s book focuses on the 1900-06 period when the Upper Peninsula in general and Houghton in particular dominated the early seasons of professional hockey on that continent, said Volkman, who noted that the book includes full reprints of reporting. contemporary sports and site photographs. , the players, their shirts and equipment.

“Sproule dives deep into game statistics so you can learn the names of players and their performance game by game. “ said Volkman.

He also wrote: “Surely you are now wondering how and why this happened in Houghton, as opposed to Minneapolis, Detroit or even Montreal? Since hockey was already Canada’s national pastime, why wouldn’t they have the first professional hockey teams? As it turns out, the Ontario Hockey Association dominated the sport and his emphasis on amateur teams ultimately created an economic opportunity for Houghton.

“The city was ideally located with rail links, thanks to the copper mining industry, to move players from Canada to the United States and from that advantage, being able to field a team to challenge American teams as far as Pennsylvania. . The OHA ethos, reserved for amateurs, was purely intended to keep working class scum from coming off the ice so that hockey could remain a gentleman’s sport.

Sproule’s book, Volkman said, excels in detail in the second half of the book where he dissects every game from the 1904, 1905, and 1906 seasons when the Copper Country teams ruled the professional leagues. Statistics for all International Hockey League teams are provided, including Calumet, Portage Lake, Michigan Soo, Canadian Soo and Pittsburgh.

UPPAA said the book can be purchased at Copper World in Calumet, Grandpa’s Barn in Copper Harbor, Michigan Made in Houghton and Marquette, the North Wind Books at Finlandia University in Hancock, Jim’s Foodmart in Houghton and Keweenaw National Historic Park in Calumet. Copper World and Michigan Tech bookstores are the best places to order the book online, the UPPAA said.

Snowbound Books in Marquette has indicated that it plans to transport the book.

More information on the UP Notable, UP Book Review, and UPPAA Book List can be found at www.UPNotable.com. The UPPAA supports authors and publishers who live or write on the Upper Peninsula and is a Michigan nonprofit with over 100 members, many of whose books are featured on the organization’s website at address www.uppaa.org. The UPPAA welcomes the membership and participation of anyone connected with the UP and interested in writing.

Christie Mastric can be reached at 906-228-2500, ext. 250. His email address is cbleck@miningjournal.net.

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David Carroll to host book signing on Saturday at Barnes & Noble https://witheridge-devon.com/david-carroll-to-host-book-signing-on-saturday-at-barnes-noble/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 16:23:38 +0000 https://witheridge-devon.com/david-carroll-to-host-book-signing-on-saturday-at-barnes-noble/ David Carroll, author of “Hello Chattanooga!” Famous people who visited the Tennessee Valley ‘will hold a book signing this Saturday at Barnes and Noble at the Hamilton Place Mall in Chattanooga. He will be at Barnes and Noble from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. “Hello Chattanooga” is a 700-page book featuring some two hundred photos, […]]]>

David Carroll, author of “Hello Chattanooga!” Famous people who visited the Tennessee Valley ‘will hold a book signing this Saturday at Barnes and Noble at the Hamilton Place Mall in Chattanooga.

He will be at Barnes and Noble from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.

“Hello Chattanooga” is a 700-page book featuring some two hundred photos, over a hundred years of history, and a comprehensive index allowing the reader to instantly locate the date Tammy Wynette played Lake Winnie, President Franklin D. Roosevelt dedicated the Chickamauga Dam or Winston Churchill slammed the door of his Read House hotel room in the face of a journalist.

“It started out as a story of the soldiers and sailors memorial auditorium,” he said, “and then it got a lot bigger. I realized that the Tivoli Theater should be included as well. I was telling people about the project, they told me I should include the Riverbend Festival, then UTC Arena and so on. The more I delved into it I decided it should be a full story that includes all of our famous visitors, with a few stories and images mixed in. So I included all of our scenes and locations in the area, inside and out, as well as all the notable politicians, president, movie star, athlete , author, soldier and evangelist, as well as a list of films and music videos that were shot here.

The book lists visitors in each category in chronological order, from 1900 to the present day. Mr. Carroll said, “Our Tri-State region has attracted some of the world’s best-known celebrities and artists, with our historic sites, beautiful landscapes and powerful people. This book will finally give readers the opportunity to sort out a few arguments by learning the dates and places that your favorite star (or president) visited here.

“Hello Chattanooga” also lists local residents who have gained national and global fame in all fields, including political figures like Bill Brock and Estes Kefauver, athletes like Rick Honeycutt and Reggie White, and artists from Samuel L. Jackson to Usher to Kane Brown.

Amid the show listings and photographs are stories tracing the history of each local venue, especially the Memorial Auditorium and Tivoli, each approaching the 100-year mark. There are also stories detailing famous people who appeared on our local stages before they were famous, from Frank Sinatra to Billy Graham, to Jimi Hendrix, to John Goodman.

The book also points out that many of today’s superstars have performed in opening act venues, which have been hired to occupy a certain amount of time as audiences find their seats while waiting for a main act to occur. Among them, Celine Dion, Britney Spears, Jeff Foxworthy, Kenny Chesney and Taylor Swift.

There are also stories of big names who had a personal connection to the area, whether through early jobs (Jim Nabors), a quickly arranged marriage (Dolly Parton), or even run-ins with the law ( Johnny Cash).

Mr. Carroll said: “I am honored to share this interesting and valuable information which can now be added to the incredible history of our region.

“Hello Chattanooga: Famous People Who Have Visited the Tennessee Valley” is available in soft and hardcover, with signed copies on ChattanoogaRadioTV.com. The book is also on sale at Food City stores in Cleveland, Soddy-Daisy, East Brainerd, Signal Mountain Road, Hixson and St. Elmo, Zarzour’s Restaurant in Chattanooga, Wally’s in East Ridge, the Refindery on McCallie Avenue, and the Barn Nursery. , I-24 off 4th Avenue.

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Reminiscence: the rebirth of the Ohio theater https://witheridge-devon.com/reminiscence-the-rebirth-of-the-ohio-theater/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 00:00:59 +0000 https://witheridge-devon.com/reminiscence-the-rebirth-of-the-ohio-theater/ Weakened by vibrations caused by decades of truck traffic, the four chains supporting the Ohio Theater marquee broke one by one shortly after midnight on December 14, 1977, sending it crashing into the sidewalk below. . Maybe it was an omen. Less than a year later, in September 1978, the RKO Stanley-Warner Group, then operating […]]]>

Weakened by vibrations caused by decades of truck traffic, the four chains supporting the Ohio Theater marquee broke one by one shortly after midnight on December 14, 1977, sending it crashing into the sidewalk below. . Maybe it was an omen.

Less than a year later, in September 1978, the RKO Stanley-Warner Group, then operating the ornate Ohio for half a century at 122 W. North St., announced it was shutting down the theater.

Woody Owens, who had ruled Ohio for a dozen years in 1978, remembers filling the room with movies like “The Godfather” – which drew over 27,000 customers in its nine weeks in 1972 – and almost full crowds coming to see Burt Reynolds on “Semi-Tough” in the spring of 1978. “But a few good Saturdays every four months is not enough,” wrote The Lima News on September 24, 1978.

Ohio, the News wrote, “was truly an entertainment palace in the great tradition of its time” with mosaic and tiled floors and a domed ceiling with a 2,500-pound crystal chandelier.

“Perhaps the most notable architectural feature of the 92-foot by 220-foot building is the unsupported reinforced concrete span that supports the balcony,” the newspaper noted. “In 1927, it was the longest such litter in Ohio and one of the longest in the United States.”

The theater, with 1,800 seats, was built for around $ 250,000 and was built in about five months in 1927.

“It was a theater. They didn’t run in and out of this place, ”recalled one of those who were there when the theater opened years later.

“There is always a majestic beauty in the place, always a feeling of elegance,” the News recalls in 1978. “But too often there is no one to appreciate it. Too often it remains empty .

All in all, it was a long way from that night in November 1927 when over 4,000 people lined up for a chance to win less than half that number of tickets. For the next 51 years, people in the Lima area lined up in Ohio for movies, local events, and live performances ranging from burlesque to ballet.

During World War II, big bands led by Guy Lombardo, Les Brown, Louis Prima, drummer Gene Krupa and others performed for entertainment hungry audiences, and Navy recruiters used the lobby to enlist women in the WAVES. In 1943, the theater launched a campaign to collect millions of cigarettes to send the troops, while throughout the war customers who bought War Bonds were treated to a free movie.

Just before Christmas in 1943, Carmen Amaya appeared on the theater stage with her 11 sisters, brothers, father and cousins ​​for a flamenco performance that “rocked the floor of the auditorium”, according to the News. “His incredibly fast kicks, finger snaps and castanets clicks resembled animals in their fury,” the newspaper marveled.

On June 7, 1944, the day after the Allied landings in Normandy, the Lima War Legion took to the Ohio stage for its production of “Blow Your Whistle”, the proceeds of which were intended for the military canteen in Lima. . The show featured dances, songs, magic and “general fun,” the News wrote. “The play is about Lima and the whole cast is made up of people from Lima.”

When the war ended in August 1945, Ohio offers quickly reverted to more evasive rates. On November 28, 1945, the News announced that “Karston’s Atomic Scandals” would be presented on the theater stage. Headlining the great magician Darrell and his ‘Miracle Girls’, the acts include Dolores, the transparent girl, and ‘Dr. Weird’s Chamber of Horrors,’ a cleverly crafted act featuring zombies, men without head, moving in the middle of the audience.

Top performers, many of whom are sponsored by the Northwest Ohio Civic Music Association, appeared in Ohio over the next quarter century. About four months after Karston’s troupe entertained in Ohio, the Markova-Dolin ballet company performed. Violinist Isaac Stern performed in Ohio in 1949 and in the Vienna Boys’ Choir in 1950 and 1951. Jerome Hines of the Metropolitan Opera wowed local audiences in 1954. The San Francisco, Minneapolis, Pittsburgh, Cleveland, The Boston Pops and other orchestras also came to Ohio.

In July 1950, the theater’s new air conditioning system was put into operation, removing, according to the News, about 95 gallons of humidity per hour from the cavernous building. In October 1953, a “new ‘panoramic’ wide screen was installed. The 20-foot-by-40-foot screen, “the News reported, was” acceptable for use in three-dimensional images, cinemascope or standard media. “

Earlier that year, Ohio showed “Bwana Devil,” the first 3D feature film. Meanwhile, the theater marquee, “after being cut off by trucks on several occasions,” the News wrote in August 1955, was replaced by a shorter marquee, which was brought down by the vibrations created by the trucks. years later.

In the 1970s, theaters like Ohio “were being taken from the market by new, smaller theaters” with multiple screens and convenient locations in suburban malls, the News wrote in 1978. Theater manager Owens was succinct: “Time has caught up with these big barn-like theaters,” he told The News.

And that, it seemed, was that. Ohio seemed destined to become another boarded up memory or parking lot – except it had plenty of life left.

RKO-Stanley Warner sold it to Lima businessman Larry Comer in 1978. In March 1979 it reopened as Ohio Theater 2.

“The centerpiece of the renovated theater is the nightclub, called Fantasia, which has a 2,200 square foot dance floor, considered one of the largest in the state,” the News wrote on March 2, 1979. ” The lighting system can be raised to watch live shows or movies, and there will be seating for 1,450 people, according to spokespersons.

Comer has reinvented the building several times. Between 1992 and 1994, it was Slingers, a country dance club; from 1994 to 2000, it was Club Mirage, with pop and rock music; between 2000 and 2002, it was Vortex, with beat techno / dance music; between 2002 and 2006, it was Night Moves, a pop / dance club; and from 2006 to 2008 Club Rush.

In 2013, Kelly and Mike Saddler bought the Ohio, telling The News they hoped to “bring some more life” to downtown Lima.

“They turned the space of a nightclub into a venue for concerts and events, but Kelly Saddler said she would like to give other parties the chance to turn the theater into something else. “, wrote the News on April 3, 2019.

Superior Plus Realtors real estate agent Veronica Fox told News in 2019 that “he has a lot of potential, just needs a little bit of an upgrade. It will just take the right person to go there and fix it. “

The right people may have turned up in November 2020 when two Los Angeles TV producers bought it after a year of searching for a place to relaunch their dinner theater productions. Joe Correll and Michael Bouson have big plans for Ohio: theatrical dance and live musical performances on the main stage; two bars – a piano bar on the main floors and a speakeasy-style jazz bar upstairs; and a renovated Ohio Hall that will be used as a rehearsal studio, according to the News.

“Our philosophy is that this theater doesn’t really belong to us, it belongs to the city of Lima,” Bouson told The News. “It has been around for 100 years. We are the gatekeepers to keep going and hopefully take a step forward, but we are counting on the community to be a part of it. “

“It’s Our Town” was performed at the Ohio Theater in 1947. It closed as a theater in 1978.

Contact Greg Hoersten at info@limanews.com.

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Most are in favor of action on climate change, although the public is divided on its urgency: POLL https://witheridge-devon.com/most-are-in-favor-of-action-on-climate-change-although-the-public-is-divided-on-its-urgency-poll/ https://witheridge-devon.com/most-are-in-favor-of-action-on-climate-change-although-the-public-is-divided-on-its-urgency-poll/#respond Fri, 12 Nov 2021 11:03:01 +0000 https://witheridge-devon.com/most-are-in-favor-of-action-on-climate-change-although-the-public-is-divided-on-its-urgency-poll/ A large majority of Americans view climate change as a serious problem and support government regulation of greenhouse gas emissions to address it. Yet the public is divided over the urgency of the issue, contrary to the views of leaders at the COP26 climate summit in Scotland. Leaders of the world conference, which ends today, […]]]>

A large majority of Americans view climate change as a serious problem and support government regulation of greenhouse gas emissions to address it. Yet the public is divided over the urgency of the issue, contrary to the views of leaders at the COP26 climate summit in Scotland.

Leaders of the world conference, which ends today, described climate change as an existential threat to humanity that demands a concerted response. In a new ABC News / Washington Post poll, however, Americans were divided, at 45-49%, whether it is an “urgent problem that requires immediate government action” or “a problem. longer term that requires further study ”first. (Five percent say it’s not a problem.) Opinions that it’s urgent are 8 percentage points above their peak, 53%, in 2018.

See PDF for full results and graphics.

Nonetheless, other results from this poll, produced for ABC by Langer Research Associates, show continued substantial majority support for the action, albeit without steady growth. In one of them, 67% qualified climate change as a serious problem facing the country, of which 57% qualified it as very serious. Both are pretty much the same as in a 2014 ABC / Post poll.

In another, 70% say the federal government should regulate greenhouse gas emissions from sources such as power plants, cars and factories in an attempt to reduce global warming. It has ranged from 65% to 75% in half a dozen polls since 2009.

The intensity of sentiment is on the regulatory side: 48% are strongly in favor of regulating greenhouse gas emissions against 16% strongly opposed. That said, strong support is at a numerical low; it peaked at 54% in April 2009.

Groups

Political opinions play an important role in these attitudes. In one example, the decline since 2018 in viewing climate change as urgent is greatest among conservatives, down 13 points, compared to insignificant declines (3 and 4 points) among moderates and liberals. .

Indeed, 95% of Democrats and Liberals see this as a serious problem compared to half of Republicans and Conservatives, respectively 39% and 41%. Independents and moderates fall between the two, with 69% and 75% saying it is a serious problem.

There are also notable differences by race / ethnicity, metropolitan status, education, and age, although majorities in these groups rate climate change as a serious problem. That’s 93% of blacks, 72% of Hispanics, and 60% of whites. That’s 76% among city dwellers and 67% among suburbanites, falling to 54% among rural residents. Seventy-eight percent of those with a graduate degree say it is a serious problem, compared to 64% of those without a college degree. And 78% of 18-29 year olds consider it to be serious compared to 64% of those 30 and over.

Viewing climate change as a “very” serious problem is soaring among liberals (92%), Democrats (90%) and black people (85%). It is lowest among strong conservatives (21%), Republicans (25%), evangelical white Protestants (26%) and those who identify as “somewhat” conservative (37%).

Opinions about the seriousness of the problem inform attitudes about the urgency of solving it. Of those who think climate change is a very serious problem, 73% think it is urgent and requires immediate government action. This drops sharply to 16% of those who think it is a serious but not very serious problem and to 4% of those who do not think it is a serious problem.

These views are also consistent with support for greenhouse gas regulation. This is supported by 89% of those who consider climate change to be very serious and 69% of those who consider it to be serious, compared to 40% of those who do not consider it to be serious. A relationship also exists in terms of urgency: those who see an urgent problem are 40 points more likely than others to support emissions controls, 93% versus 53%.

Methodology

This ABC News / Washington Post poll was conducted by landline and cell phone from November 7-10, 2021, in English and Spanish, with a random national sample of 1,001 adults. The results have a margin of sampling error of 3.5 percentage points, including the design effect. Partisan divisions are 27-26-37%, Democrats-Republicans-Independents.

The survey was produced for ABC News by Langer Research Associates of New York with sampling and data collection by Abt Associates of Rockville, Maryland. See details on the survey methodology here.

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13 amazing little towns in the upstate that are well worth a stop https://witheridge-devon.com/13-amazing-little-towns-in-the-upstate-that-are-well-worth-a-stop/ https://witheridge-devon.com/13-amazing-little-towns-in-the-upstate-that-are-well-worth-a-stop/#respond Wed, 10 Nov 2021 19:56:35 +0000 https://witheridge-devon.com/13-amazing-little-towns-in-the-upstate-that-are-well-worth-a-stop/ The 13 villages on this list are small, that’s undeniable. In fact, each has a population of less than 1,000. Yet for veteran road warriors like me (and you?), Everyone has that little something that will call us from the road and invite us to stop and explore. Why is the National Abolition Museum located […]]]>

The 13 villages on this list are small, that’s undeniable. In fact, each has a population of less than 1,000. Yet for veteran road warriors like me (and you?), Everyone has that little something that will call us from the road and invite us to stop and explore. Why is the National Abolition Museum located in a small village in upstate New York? What are the three bears and why can’t you see anything like it in the state? An entire village dedicated to selling books? A place of a few hundred inhabitants which is the center of studies of the spiritual life of the state? All fascinating, all worth a stop, and all …very small!

These tiny towns in the upstate each have an incredible historical note

Each of the 13 villages on this list has less than 1,000 inhabitants. Still, they all have something worth stopping for a visit too. Something historic, fun or just plain fascinating, each is worth a detour. Visit the three bears at Ovid (pop. 602). You won’t see this anywhere else in the United States. Stop by and say hello to the stars of “The Beekman Boys” TV in Sharon Springs (pop. 558). And why the National Abolition Museum and Hall of Fame in Peterboro (pop. 176)? Each of these little map dots has a great story to tell.

REST IN PEACE: The Last Resting Places of 32 Famous Americans in Upstate New York

Many notable people made their home in upstate New York … so much so that they were buried here.

Looked… if you dare.

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